How Much Should a Tax Attorney Charge?

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How Much should an IRS Tax Attorney Charge?

What is the role of IRS tax attorney? How is an IRS tax attorney different from a regular attorney? What kinds of issues does an IRS tax attorney deal with? What can an IRS tax attorney do to help people with different kinds of tax problems? Does an IRS tax attorney work for the government? Can an IRS tax attorney help me if I’m not a big business? Is hiring an IRS tax attorney expensive?

If you are an individual who presently needs or may sometime require the assistance of an IRS tax attorney, or are considering becoming an IRS tax attorney yourself, you may have these types of questions about the job description of an IRS tax attorney. Indeed, if you find yourself in the above situations, it is helpful to understand just what an IRS tax attorney does every day. Below is a condensed list of several important roles of an IRS tax attorney. Following the list, each role of an IRS tax attorney is explained in greater detail:

  1. IRS Tax Attorney Role #1: IRS Tax Attorney for the IRS
  2. IRS Tax Attorney Role #2: Counsel and Consulting
  3. IRS Tax Attorney Role #3: Litigation Assistance
  4. IRS Tax Attorney Role #4: Auditing Assistance
  5. IRS Tax Attorney Role #5: Tax Crimes Representation
  6. IRS Tax Attorney Role #6: Levies and Liens Assistance
  7. IRS Tax Attorney Role #7: Estate Tax Assistance

IRS Tax Attorney Role #1: IRS Tax Attorney for the IRS

The moniker “IRS tax attorney” can be a somewhat confusing, because it can suggest several meanings. First, “IRS tax attorney” can refer to a person who is an attorney employed by the IRS. The second possible meaning of “IRS tax attorney” is actually quite an opposite role–this type of IRS tax attorney would be someone who represents an individual or business in legal matters where the opposing counsel would often be the first type of IRS tax attorney. In short, the IRS has its own attorneys who practice law for the IRS, and individuals or businesses may hire a private attorney who may also be referred to as an IRS tax attorney, but who will advocate for the client rather than the IRS. IRS tax attorneys are available to help individuals and businesses with many tax problems and in a range of financial situations. Further mentions of the term “IRS tax attorney” with respect to the roles of such an individual may be taken to imply the second definition–an IRS tax attorney retained by a private individual or business.

IRS Tax Attorney Role #2: Counsel and Consulting

A role in which an IRS tax attorney can be very helpful to private citizens or businesses is that of a consultant. To the layperson or business owner, both tax regulations and law can be very confusing and complicated. An IRS tax attorney can not only explain which regulations apply to his or her client and in what ways, but the IRS tax attorney can also offer advice to the client regarding applicable tax loopholes, strategies, and ways for him or her be subject to the minimum amount of tax. Because he is an expert in both tax and law, the IRS tax attorney is the optimum advocate in cases like this.

IRS Tax Attorney Role #3: Litigation Assistance

Though nobody would wish to be in a tax situation so bad that it ends up in court, should you find yourself in such a position, you’ll want to have an IRS tax attorney on your side. While your trusted family attorney may be fine for handling your simple divorce, tax litigation requires a trained specialist with expertise in taxes as well as law, who is used to doing battle against the IRS’ own lawyers in the courtroom. You guessed it: an IRS tax attorney.

IRS Tax Attorney Role #4: Auditing Assistance

Besides being taken to court for tax-related reasons, being chosen for an audit is another nightmare of taxpayers. In this case, too, an IRS tax attorney can be very helpful. He can walk you through the entire process, provide helpful insights the average person would certainly miss, and lend you support during that trying time. In some cases, your IRS tax attorney can even negotiate with the IRS to minimize any extra taxes you might owe as a result of the audit.

IRS Tax Attorney Role #5: Tax Crimes Representation

If you have committed tax fraud, or have simply failed to pay your taxes for whatever reason, you may be charged with commission of a tax crime. In a case like this, an IRS tax attorney would become your new best friend. Your IRS tax attorney would work hard to minimize the damage to your financial situation, reputation, and general quality of life due to the tax crimes committed. Of course, crimes come with consequences, but each situation is different, and having an expert IRS tax attorney on your side would win you the best possible outcome.

IRS Tax Attorney Role #6: Levies and Liens Assistance

If, for some reason, an individual cannot pay his or her taxes, the IRS may, in some cases, place levies and/or liens upon the assets of that individual. This means that the government can seize or take ownership of property and funds to ensure that the taxpayer’s debt is settled. During this process, too, it is extremely helpful for an individual to retain an IRS tax attorney as an advocate. The IRS tax attorney will be able to argue the taxpayer’s case to the government, and find the best-case scenario for the individual, again by drawing upon his or her extensive and specialized body of knowledge.

IRS Tax Attorney Role #7: Estate Tax Assistance

Though many of the situations above may seem dire or extreme, estate tax matters are something that most individuals have to deal with at some point in time. When a person passes away, those who inherit his or her worldly possessions are often taxed on their inheritance. Because of this, an IRS tax attorney is helpful for both the senior planning his or her estate, and those who inherit the goods of the deceased. An IRS tax attorney can help with estate planning by suggesting ways to minimize the taxes that will be owed by the loved ones later on. Similarly, the IRS tax attorney can help inheritors after the fact by providing the same type of service. IRS tax attorneys can advise inheritors regarding investments or payment plans that may make inheritance tax burdens more bearable.

As we can see, an IRS tax attorney may work for a variety of groups or individuals and perform a variety of services for his or her clients. Indeed, the job of an IRS tax attorney can be exciting because, though an IRS tax attorney works with a very specific type of law, he or she might take on many types of cases throughout his or her career. This affords the IRS tax attorney the advantage of both being a specialized expert in a particular field, and also allows him or her to avoid the monotony that can also come with working in a specialized field. If this is something that appeals to you, you might consider becoming an IRS tax attorney yourself!

Becoming an IRS Tax Attorney

Like anything worth doing, becoming an attorney takes a lot of time and effort. Becoming an IRS tax attorney specifically is no different, and, in fact, requires the development of skills and knowledge beyond that required to practice general law. An IRS tax attorney needs to have studied tax law, which is an area of specialization that the IRS tax attorney would focus on either during or in addition to their law school education. For this reason, an IRS Tax Attorney would have a more extensive and specific body of knowledge when compared to regular attorneys.

Thus, the process of becoming an IRS tax attorney takes a lot of focus and dedication, and an individual who wishes to become an IRS tax attorney should start that process as early as possible. Several helpful tips for successfully becoming an IRS tax attorney are listed below, and subsequently explained in greater detail:

Becoming an IRS Tax Attorney Tip #1: Cultivate Desire and Motivation

The first thing an individual needs to find success in any endeavor is a desire to achieve and sufficient motivation to see a goal through, even when it is difficult. The road to becoming an IRS tax attorney is long and challenging, and will require a great amount of both desire and motivation. Those who would like to become IRS tax attorneys must be willing to be in school for a long time, and must be up to the challenge of meeting stringent requirements in almost every arena. Candidates must also pass grueling exams, and be able to keep up in a very competitive environment.

Becoming an IRS Tax Attorney Tip #2: Get Informed

Because the dedication of one’s life to the pursuit of becoming an IRS tax attorney is a very big investment, it is best to know exactly what you are getting into before you start down that path. Research in detail the job description of an IRS tax attorney. Look into educational programs and financial obligations. Find an IRS tax attorney in your area and interview or shadow him or her. You can never get too much information!

Becoming an IRS Tax Attorney Tip #3: Focus on Your Education

In order to achieve the end goal of becoming a successful IRS tax attorney at a prestigious firm or organization, it is extremely important that you maintain an excellent academic standard. Start as early as you can, and dedicate yourself to your studies. Good grades in high school will allow you to attend a good university, where academic success will be your key to being accepted to the right law school.

Becoming an IRS Tax Attorney Tip #4: Know the Right People

In addition to academics, networking is another key to success for an individual who wishes to become an IRS tax attorney. Maintaining connections with influential individuals in fields or organizations related to law and tax law can often open many doors, including internships, letters of recommendation, and even jobs!

Becoming an IRS Tax Attorney Tip #5: Establish the Right Background

In today’s job market, most employers are looking for people who already have experience in their desired profession. Don’t let yourself become a victim of this stipulation. If you want to be an IRS tax attorney, start as soon as possible to get any type of experience working, volunteering, or interning in a related field. Every little bit counts, and experience will be a great asset later on.

Becoming an IRS Tax Attorney Tip #6: Do Your Homework

If your goal is to become an IRS tax attorney and you have not already attended college, do some research. Find a school within your specifications that has a good reputation and offers a pre-law program, or law-related classes. While the university you attend is not the biggest factor in being accepted to law school or being hired as an IRS tax attorney, it is impressive when you are a graduate of a reputable institution.

Becoming an IRS Tax Attorney Tip #7: Make Good College Choices

Similar to the university you choose to attend, the classes you choose to take as a student can affect your future success. If you want to become an IRS tax attorney and your school offers a pre-law track, take advantage of it. If no such program is offered, take law-related elective courses or declare a law-related major. Take courses that challenge you. An IRS tax attorney needs to be intelligent and motivated, and intelligence and motivation can be indicated by a student’s course choices and load.

Becoming an IRS Tax Attorney Tip #8: Be Smart About the LSAT and the Bar

The biggest step in between college and law school is the dreaded LSAT, and the even bigger step after law school is the Bar Exam. The LSAT is large deciding factor for the admissions committees of most law schools, and the Bar Exam determines if an attorney is eligible to practice law. Because of this, it is essential that a future IRS tax attorney be prepared on both LSAT and Bar Exam days. Take the LSAT test early, so that you’ll have time to retake it if your scores are not what you would like them to be. Avail yourself of the many study helps and classes for both the Bar and the LSAT available to aspiring lawyers. Form study groups with your peers or those who have already taken the test. Most importantly, commit to prepare for the LSAT and the Bar Exam in your chosen way, and follow through.

Becoming an IRS Tax Attorney Tip #9: Make Law School Connections

Once in law school, you will need to work hard, but it will also benefit you greatly if you get to know the people around you. More than likely, at least one professor or fellow student is, has been, or wants to become an IRS tax attorney. These people will also likely have other connections that can be helpful to you. And, if you establish a good rapport with them, you may be able to work with or for them, or use them as a reference for employment elsewhere.

Becoming an IRS Tax Attorney Tip #10: Learn to Prioritize

After all the education and exams are over, a new IRS tax attorney can enter the job market and prepare for life as a lawyer. Because law is a competitive field, rookie IRS tax attorneys must be prepared to start at entry-level jobs that often require very long hours. Before you get in over your head, get your priorities straight. Figure out what is most important to you, and how much time you will be able to devote to your job. Decide which things can be placed at a lower priority than your goal of becoming an IRS tax attorney, and those that are most important to you. Deciding these things before you enter the workforce will help you live your life as an IRS tax attorney to the fullest.

Becoming an IRS Tax Attorney Tip #11: Know How to Sell Yourself

It is well known that lawyers must be well spoken and convincing in a court of law. But, aspiring lawyers and IRS tax attorneys must also be convincing and well spoken as they attempt to find a job in their chosen profession. Before you enter the job market, prepare to present yourself in the best and most professional way possible. Create an exceptional resume, secure good references, and prepare to highlight your skills and positive attributes in an interview situation. Remember that the field of law is very competitive, so look for ways that you are unique, and things you may have to offer that others do not. Above all else, be confident in your skills, accomplishments, and hard work!

An IRS tax attorney has the potential to help many people in frustrating tax situations throughout his or her career. Not only is the career lucrative and engaging, but it also provides the satisfaction of knowing that you have made a difference in the lives of others. If you need the assistance of an IRS tax attorney for your tax situation, look to the internet, phone book, friends or colleagues, or non-profit organizations for help in finding an IRS tax attorney who will be well-suited to your particular needs and financial situation. If you, yourself, would like to help others by becoming an IRS tax attorney, consider the tips above and remember first to help yourself to achieve that goal successfully.